Tuesday, June 10, 2014

Chronic Cough Alternatives

 
  Written by JP

 http://www.healthyfellow.com/

The so-called “common cold” usually comes and goes in an expected, generic manner. You’re congested for a few days, you sneeze and your throat aches for a week tops. In most cases, it’s not a big deal and requires little or no medical intervention. But, for some, a lingering cough can stick around long after the cold exits stage right. There are several reasons why this typically occurs including bacterial infections, chronic irritation of the airways and/or overuse of nasal decongestant sprays – more than three days.
If you’re one the unlucky ones who encounter a chronic cough after a cold infection you can and should consider natural remedies to help restore your normal state of wellness. And, thankfully, you don’t have to rely on old wives’ tales or questionable anecdotes. Instead, consider the following, evidence-based approaches.

Far and away, the best documented natural remedy for chronic coughs in adults and children is pure honey. Normally, I don’t encourage the use of concentrated sweeteners. However, in the case of honey, it is well worth trying for those with long term coughs that don’t require antibiotic intervention. Acute use of honey is unlikely to cause any harmful, lasting effects. Furthermore, adding certain wholesome ingredients to honey such as coffee and pure cocoa powder may result in even better outcomes. For instance, a recent study published in Primary Care Respiratory Journal reports that combining instant coffee and honey is significantly more effective in reducing persistent post-infectious cough (PPC) as compared to systemic steroid treatment. In addition, theobromine, a naturally occurring chemical found in cocoa, is now considered a “novel and promising” antitussive “drug” thanks to positive, preliminary research and a favorable safety profile. This suggests that a natural cocktail containing cocoa, coffee and honey may be a tasty and viable alternative for those trying to overcome PPC.

If cocoa and coffee aren’t right for you or if you require more support, I suggest a well formulated herbal tincture consisting of eucalyptus, ivy, licorice and thyme. In the US, a liquid supplement containing all of these therapeutic ingredients is sold under the name Bronchosan – distributed and manufactured by A. Vogel. Gargling and then swallowing this composition appears to ease throat irritation, relax bronchial tubes and thins mucus in the lungs allowing for efficient expectoration. Also, this herbal blend possesses antibacterial properties which may assist the immune system in overcoming infections. Finally, this sugar-free formula may be further enhanced by mixing it with honey and warm water. Personally, I think it’s a far better option than conventional, synthetic cough syrups which only provide temporary symptomatic relief and the real risk of side-effects.


Posted June 3, 2014

Best Exercise in Ever: The Front Plank. Seriously, in Ever


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I tend to involve a lot of planking variations in my clients training programs, and there’s a very simple reason for this. For bang for your buck exercises, I haven’t found one that creates as much of a benefit in a short period of time as a plank. In terms of increasing mobility through the hips, pre-activating the core muscles to help with spinal stabilization, getting people to learn and lock in neutral spinal positioning, and even working on coaching breathing behind a braced core, it tends to do a lot of things when done well.
The big take home point of that opening paragraph: Planks are tha awesome.
The downside is that a lot of people wind up doing planks in a god-awful manner, and do something that more resembles an Instagram fitness “celebrity” showing off their butt for a ready camera.
bad plank

I’ll be right back, I just need to stop my eyes from bleeding after seeing something like that.
Most planks wind up falling into 3 main categories:
  1. The neck is below the chest, meaning all the stabilization is coming from the shoulders and neck.
  2. The pelvis is in anterior tilt and the butt is above the line from the knees and ribs. This means the hip flexors and low back are doing all the work in a shortened state, which is great if you have nothing better to do for the next hour and want a new position by which you can read the morning paper. It’s not very challenging, and in reality it doesn’t do much beneficial stuff for you.
  3. Hard rounding through the thoracic spine. The shoulders are doing all the work, but the rectus abdominis (six-pack muscles) are doing something in a shortened position, which is essentially like holding a reverse crunch.
The best way to approach a plank is to think of getting into a linear body position where the head, shoulders, hips and knees are in a straight line. Essentially, what ever would be ideal posture when standing is what ideal posture would be when planking, except, you know, more horizontal.
Here’s a quick tutorial video on how to set up into a fantastic plank.
A good plank should be controlled massive tension through the entire body, where you have the goal of generating maximal muscle force throughout the total system and breathe in a deep and powerful manner. If you can do more than 15 seconds in a plank position, you’re not tensing hard enough. Work HARDER!!!
In a programming means, you should ideally accumulate time in each set through multiple “reps” of 10-15 seconds. An example is 4 sets of 15 seconds, with a 5 second recovery between reps. Smash your hips and core as hard as possible, and breathe deeply and forcefully.
Enjoy!!

Most planks wind up falling into 3 main categories:
  1. The neck is below the chest, meaning all the stabilization is coming from the shoulders and neck.
  2. The pelvis is in anterior tilt and the butt is above the line from the knees and ribs. This means the hip flexors and low back are doing all the work in a shortened state, which is great if you have nothing better to do for the next hour and want a new position by which you can read the morning paper. It’s not very challenging, and in reality it doesn’t do much beneficial stuff for you.
  3. Hard rounding through the thoracic spine. The shoulders are doing all the work, but the rectus abdominis (six-pack muscles) are doing something in a shortened position, which is essentially like holding a reverse crunch.
The best way to approach a plank is to think of getting into a linear body position where the head, shoulders, hips and knees are in a straight line. Essentially, what ever would be ideal posture when standing is what ideal posture would be when planking, except, you know, more horizontal.
Here’s a quick tutorial video on how to set up into a fantastic plank.
- See more at: http://deansomerset.com/best-exercise-ever-front-plank-seriously-ever/#sthash.LNqBvuPX.dpuf
- See more at: http://deansomerset.com/best-exercise-ever-front-plank-seriously-ever/#sthash.LNqBvuPX.dpuf
Most planks wind up falling into 3 main categories:
  1. The neck is below the chest, meaning all the stabilization is coming from the shoulders and neck.
  2. The pelvis is in anterior tilt and the butt is above the line from the knees and ribs. This means the hip flexors and low back are doing all the work in a shortened state, which is great if you have nothing better to do for the next hour and want a new position by which you can read the morning paper. It’s not very challenging, and in reality it doesn’t do much beneficial stuff for you.
  3. Hard rounding through the thoracic spine. The shoulders are doing all the work, but the rectus abdominis (six-pack muscles) are doing something in a shortened position, which is essentially like holding a reverse crunch.
The best way to approach a plank is to think of getting into a linear body position where the head, shoulders, hips and knees are in a straight line. Essentially, what ever would be ideal posture when standing is what ideal posture would be when planking, except, you know, more horizontal.
Here’s a quick tutorial video on how to set up into a fantastic plank.
- See more at: http://deansomerset.com/best-exercise-ever-front-plank-seriously-ever/#sthash.LNqBvuPX.dpuf
Most planks wind up falling into 3 main categories:
  1. The neck is below the chest, meaning all the stabilization is coming from the shoulders and neck.
  2. The pelvis is in anterior tilt and the butt is above the line from the knees and ribs. This means the hip flexors and low back are doing all the work in a shortened state, which is great if you have nothing better to do for the next hour and want a new position by which you can read the morning paper. It’s not very challenging, and in reality it doesn’t do much beneficial stuff for you.
  3. Hard rounding through the thoracic spine. The shoulders are doing all the work, but the rectus abdominis (six-pack muscles) are doing something in a shortened position, which is essentially like holding a reverse crunch.
The best way to approach a plank is to think of getting into a linear body position where the head, shoulders, hips and knees are in a straight line. Essentially, what ever would be ideal posture when standing is what ideal posture would be when planking, except, you know, more horizontal.
Here’s a quick tutorial video on how to set up into a fantastic plank.
- See more at: http://deansomerset.com/best-exercise-ever-front-plank-seriously-ever/#sthash.LNqBvuPX.dpuf
Most planks wind up falling into 3 main categories:
  1. The neck is below the chest, meaning all the stabilization is coming from the shoulders and neck.
  2. The pelvis is in anterior tilt and the butt is above the line from the knees and ribs. This means the hip flexors and low back are doing all the work in a shortened state, which is great if you have nothing better to do for the next hour and want a new position by which you can read the morning paper. It’s not very challenging, and in reality it doesn’t do much beneficial stuff for you.
  3. Hard rounding through the thoracic spine. The shoulders are doing all the work, but the rectus abdominis (six-pack muscles) are doing something in a shortened position, which is essentially like holding a reverse crunch.
The best way to approach a plank is to think of getting into a linear body position where the head, shoulders, hips and knees are in a straight line. Essentially, what ever would be ideal posture when standing is what ideal posture would be when planking, except, you know, more horizontal.
Here’s a quick tutorial video on how to set up into a fantastic plank.
- See more at: http://deansomerset.com/best-exercise-ever-front-plank-seriously-ever/#sthash.LNqBvuPX.dpuf

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